Buckeye Hot Springs
Latitude 38.2392
Longitude 119.325
Elevation 6840 feet
Temperature 60 c
Flow Rate 400 liters/minute
Dissolved Solids 1230 grams/liter
7.5 Quadrangle Twin Lakes
State California
County Mono

Buckeye Hot Springs is situated on a riverbank of Buckeye Creek. There is a pine forest on both sides of the river and a campground about a mile up stream. You take a dirt road from Highway 395 up into the mountains of the Toiyabe National Forest. The road is a little rough but the view is great. While on the ridge you can see the entire valley including the little town of Bridgeport. The roads are well marked and you will proceed into the mouth of the canyon. You will continue to climb to an elevation of 7030 feet. Here you will see the parking area to your left. There are several springs in the area. The locals have built two small pools just below and slightly west of the parking area. The water is not as hot as the main pool but still quite nice. At the east end of the parking area is the trail leading to the main springs down by the river’s edge. It is nearly a 200-foot decent to the springs. Just prior to reaching the rivers edge you will see a travertine build up that channels the water to the pool. The source temperature is 60 degrees C. The pool is large and may or may not be crowded. Letting in the cold water from the stream controls the temperature of the pool. When I was there it was during the spring runoff so the riverbank was high and there were several more pools that were underwater. There is even a little grotto that you can go into, by first passing through a shower of hot water running down the mountainside. The combination of the stream, forest, and hot water makes this an excellent spring.


Crab Cooker Hot Springs
Latitude 37.6633
Longitude 118.7995
Elevation 6857 Feet
Temperature Very Hot
Flow Rate ?
Dissolved Solids ?
7.5 Quadrangle Whitmore Hot Springs
State California
County Mono

Crab Cooker is hot, very hot. So hot that you will need to let it cool off for a couple of hours if you refill it. That’s just what happened when I was there. When we found it, it was empty. I couldn’t figure out how to fill it. While I was scrounging around one of the locals showed up and pointed out where the valve was. It is inside a little tube that is stuck in the ground. The problem is the valve is underwater and you have to stick your hand in to turn it. Better bring some heavy latex groves for insulation. The springs is in a very nice setting with fields of grass all around. It is fairly deep too. Looks perfect but I didn’t have time to wait around. It is also called “Fleur de Lys hot spring”.


Crowley Hot Springs
Latitude 37.6607
Longitude 118.7665
Elevation 6850 feet
Temperature Hot
Flow Rate ?
Dissolved Solids ?
7.5 Quadrangle Whitmore Hot Springs
State California
County Mono

Crowley Hot Springs is a group of two springs that are sitting in a grassy meadow. These are very nice springs that are a little more involved to get to than most of the others. The map I have provided should make it much easier. While sitting in these springs you can watch all the wild birds in the fields. The springs seem to be fairly popular, however if you go in the morning you should have them to yourself. The other problem is if it rains these could be a real problem to get to. The whole area will turn to marsh. There are a lot of stories of people getting their cars stuck in the mud. There are parking areas to the east and west of the springs but the last couple hundred yards you have to hike. The larger spring (shown at the top of the page) is hotter and is the popular one. It has a nickname of Wild Willie. The smaller spring isn’t as hot but is much prettier and has a nice view.


Delongha Hot Springs
Latitude 35.5574
Longitude 118.6117
Elevation 2080 feet
Temperature 111 F
Flow Rate 95 95 liters/minute
Dissolved Solids ? grams/liter
7.5 quadrangle Democrate Hot Springs
State California
County Kern

Delonegha used to be the little jewel of the Kern River. Unfortunately, a private party recently purchased it. They are intending to develop it. At present, the rumor is they charge five dollars to use the springs. The problem is that in order to keep people out they had the road posted for no parking. They have also bull doze dirt onto other areas that could be used for parking. I have seen a lot of cars that park about a mile south of the springs. It appears that everybody then hikes up to the springs. They are well worth the trouble. The springs are of low sulfur water that is a perfect temperature. The view from them is breath taking. There are several pools situated on a ledge overlooking the Kern River. I think they are high enough not to be washed out during the spring runoff. Another set of pools is on the other side of a rock formation that sits next to the river’s edge.

To get there you take highway 178 northeast from Bakersfield. The highway will follow the Kern River on the south side. When you cross over the river the highway turns from a two-lane to a four-lane highway. This is the area that I show on the topo map. You can just barely see some of the spring area as you drive by. You will need to turn around and park where everyone else does, south of the river.

Recent Events:
Jim Voelkl, an experienced river rafter, reports that the owner of the land surrounding Delonegha has abandoned the property, since he could not legally restrict the public use of the springs. However, before he left he destroyed all but one of the pools. Hopefully the locals will rebuild them but parking still may be a problem.


Fales Hot Springs

Latitude 38.3505
Longitude 119.4003
Elevation 7800
Temperature 82 C
Flow Rate 1900 liters/minute
Dissolved Solids 2400 mg/liter
7.5 Quadrangle ?
State California
County Mono

Fales Hot Springs is an old resort now in ruins. The actual source of the springs is fenced off and no trespassing is allowed. However with such a large flow rate the runoff is more than sufficient. The only problem is that it is right next to highway 395. So there is no peace and tranquility that goes with most other springs. Also, by the time the water gets to public land it has cooled off substantially. Therefore it is only a mediocre hot springs. But at least it is easy to get to. Sorry but I don’t have a topo map of the area. To get there you drive west from Bridgeport thirteen miles. The old resort will be on your left and the runoff will be about a tenth of a mile on your right.


HillTop Hot Springs
Latitude 37.6642
Longitude 118.7883
Elevation 6873 Feet
Temperature Hot
Flow Rate ?
Dissolved Solids ?
7.5 Quadrangle Whitmore Hot Springs
State California
County Mono

Hilltop springs is a great little springs. It sits atop a small mesa in the center of the Long Valley caldera. There is only a short drive on dirt roads to get to it. From the springs you have a nice view of everything around. You don’t have to worry about anyone sneaking up on you. The source is about a hundred feet to the east of the pool on unstable ground. My wife and I went looking for it and I ended up in the mud. There is water all over the place and from the parking area you have to walk on a bunch of old boards to keep from stepping in the mud. You better watch your step if you are going there at night. The water seems to be a perfect temperature and the pool is a nice size but not very deep. You can control the water temperature by a complicated set of valves. Hilltop is also called Pulky’s pool. I wonder who Pulky is.


Hot Creek Hot Springs

Latitude 37.6645
Longitude 118.8275
Elevation 6950 feet
Temperature 82 c
Flow Rate 15000 liters/minute
Dissolved Solids 1100mg/liter
7.5 Quadrangle Whitmore Hot Springs
State California
County Mono

Hot Creek Hot Springs is by far the most impressive hot springs in California, if not the country. Not only is the water hot (82c) but it has a remarkable flow rate of Fifteen thousand liters per minute. It could fill an average size swimming pool in five minutes. The major source spring sits on the west side of Hot Creek. From a hundred yards away you can hear the low rumble and hissing of the hot water. When I was there the forest service had just removed the bridge. Apparently, it was put there during some film shoot several decades ago. The bridge was never meant to last. Once it started tipping the only safe thing to do was to remove it. The forest service says they have just received funding to starting building a new one next year. Until then you have to swim across the river. Even with the incredible flow rate of the springs it is no match for the volume of the river. As a result it still is a little chilly to swim in. Until you get to where the spring and river water mix then its start to warm up fast. The problem with Hot creek is it is too much of a good thing and so the entire area is unstable. The forest service limits its use to daytime only and has roped off areas that are particularly dangerous. However on the plus side they have built a nice parking area, complete with restrooms and a paved trail down to the river. Even if you are not a hot springs enthusiast it is still worth visiting when you are in the Mammoth area.


Keough Hot Springs

Latitude 37.2538
Longitude 118.3765
Elevation 4530
Temperature 51 C
Flow Rate 2000 liters/minute
Dissolved Solids 510 mg/liter
7.5 Quadrangle ?
State California
County Inyo

Keough Hot Springs should actually be renamed as Keough Hot Creek. The original springs are a developed resort, but they are so hot and plentiful that everyone uses the runoff. The springs are about eight miles south of Bishop, on the West Side of Highway 395. To get there turn off on Keough Hot Springs road and head west about 0.5 mile. You will come to a dirt road intersection. Turn right heading north in will cross over the creek in only 0.1-mile. The latitude and longitude of the pools is 37 15.52′ 118 22.24′. You will see some high power lines to the west. Some of the hotter pools are under these lines. Find yourself a suitable spring. These springs are actually on private property belonging to the city of Los Angeles. There are signs about no overnight camping, but day use seems to be allowed. The source seems to be about a half mile to the west with the creek running to the east. There are a lot of pools made along the creek. If a pool is to hot or cold you simply move east or west to another one. You can hike along the stream to see just how many pools there are.

Recent Developments: (5/1/99)
Several unconfirmed reports have said that the flow rate at Keough has dropped off considerably. I don’t know if this is a result of a change in the watershed or a man made diversion.


Little Hot Creek Hot Springs

Latitude 37.6900
Longitude 118.8400
Elevation 6990 feet
Temperature 82 C
Flow Rate 720 liters/minute
Dissolved Solids 1240 mg/liter
7.5 Quadrangle Whitmore Hot Springs
State California
County Mono

Little Hot Creek is a little farther to go then most of the springs in the Long Valley Caldera but well worth the effort. The spring area is dotted with pine trees and interesting geology. In addition, you have a lot of coloration at the source springs. Don’t go near the source because the water is very hot. In fact, the entire creek is hot spring water. It takes a couple hundred yards for the water to cool sufficiently. The pool is situated where the hot water finally becomes tolerable. A small waterfall, only a foot high, helps feed the water through a large set of pipes to the pool. Both the deck and pool are made of concrete. The pool is just the right depth for soaking. The only draw back is if it gets to hot you have to wait for it to cool off. There is no cold water available.


Miracle Hot Springs

Latitude 35.5762
Longitude 118.5330
Elevation 2780 feet
Temperature ? F
Flow Rate ? liters/minute
Dissolved Solids ? grams/liter
7.5 Quadrangle Miracle Hot Springs
State California
County Kern

Miracle Hot Springs has just been reborn. They are now the most accessible and enjoyable hot spring along the Kern River. The old pools have been removed and new ones rebuilt that are larger, cleaner and easy to get to. There are no more problems with crowds and parking is available for only $5.00. In fact all the photos on this site are of the old pools. I hope to get new photos in a couple of weeks. To get there from Bakersfield travel north up highway 168. Turn onto Borel Road (1) and proceed east until you get to the Old Highway(2). Make a right turn heading South. After a couple of miles, the parking area for Hobo campground will be on the right(3). Park, and follow the signs to the springs.


Navy Hot Springs
Latitude 37.9413
Longitude 119.0218
Elevation 6400
Temperature 33 c
Flow Rate ?
Dissolved Solids ?
7.5 Quadrangle ?
State California
County Mono

Navy Hot Springs is on the south shore of Mono Lake. Of all the natural springs I have been to this is the most effervescent spring I have ever seen. You can see some of the constant bubbling action in the photos. This picturesque spring may be doomed to extinction. Currently it is illegal to use the springs and moreover the lake water level is finally starting to rise. It won’t be long before it is underwater. But for now it is a nice little spring that is inviting and illegal. However it is not a total lost for the whole area is fascinating. I have included lots of picture of the tufas. To get there simply follow the road to the Mono Lake Tufa. Take Highway 120 east and follow the signs. Park and take the scenic trail down to the tufa. From here walk along the shoreline trail to Navy Beach Parking. The springs will be about half way to Navy Beach.


Remington Hot Springs

Latitude 35.5766
Longitude 118.5476
Elevation 2240 feet
Temperature 104 -109 F
Flow Rate 19 liters/minute
Dissolved Solids ? grams/liter
7.5 Quadrangle Miracle Hot Springs
State California California
County Kern

Remington Hot Springs is a 2-3 mile hike from Miracle Hot Springs. The area is very ecologically sensitive so the Forest Service would like to see the least amount of human impact. The hike to the springs is very steep and slippery. I do not recommend taking it at night. The locals have built a concrete pool that isn’t much larger than a bathtub. But when the river is not very high there is a much larger and cooler pool that is right in the river. Sometimes when there is a lot of runoff, the river cover both pools. If that is the case there is a small springs a short distance above the main springs, that you can use. Of coarse, you can always hike back to the large, hot pools at Miracle Hot Springs.


Shepard Hot Springs

Latitude 37.6668
Longitude 118.8025
Elevation 6940
Temperature Hot
Flow Rate ?
Dissolved Solids ?
7.5 Quadrangle Whitmore Hot Springs
State California
County Mono

Shepard Hot Springs is the little brother of Crab Cooker. They are only about a third of a mile away from each other. The interesting thing about Shepard is all the other springs around it. They all are basically the same spring with separate vents. One of the larger vents is the source to the pool. Some of the others have yet to be made into pools. I don’t know how permanent the vents are. When I was hiking around I saw evidence of old pools long since gone. The pool itself is smaller than Crab Cooker but it is a lot deeper. With the spring sitting in a meadow, the scenery is about the same only the spring is at an intersection of dirt roads. So I would imagine that it might be kind of annoying having traffic going by. However when I was there we didn’t see anybody.

This is one of the other springs associated with Shepard Hot Springs.


The Tub Hot Springs

Latitude 37.6518
Longitude 118.8115
Elevation 6990 feet
Temperature Hot
Flow Rate ?
Dissolved Solids ?
7.5 Quadrangle Whitmore Hot Springs
State California
County Mono

The Tub seems to be the most popular hot springs (except Hot Creek) in the Long Valley caldera. And for good reason the water temperature is perfect, the depth and size of the pool is perfect and it is easy to get to. The spring is at the base of a small mound that has the source on top. There is a small network of plumbing that brings the water from the source to the pool. From the passing traffic on Whitmore Tubs Road you have some privacy but to the east you have a view of the whole valley. They probably have a view of you, but you are so far away I don’ think anyone cares. This explains the skinny dipping that seems to occur more at this spring then at the others.


Travertine Hot Springs

Latitude 38.2463
Longitude 119.2042
Elevation 6700 feet
Temperature 82 C
Flow Rate 50 liter/minute
Dissolved Solids 4320 grams/liter
7.5 Quadrangle Big Alkali
State CA
County Mono

The first thing you notice when visiting Travertine Hot Springs is all the travertine build up associated with the springs. It is obvious where the name came from. When I first arrived it was at dusk, and even in the low light you could tell the place was special. Everywhere around there was mounds of travertine that had been built up from ancient springs that are long since gone. When I returned in the morning they were even more impressive. The red, orange and pink rock contrasts the green forest that extends into the hills. The springs are about a mile southeast of the little town of Bridgeport. The travertine on the hillside is easily visible from the town. They are easily accessible via a small dirt road (Jack Sawyer Road) leading to the springs. You could also hike up from the town. At the spring you are able to look down on the city. There are two main springs that feed separate pools. The lower pools are by far the nicest. They are built right into the side of the travertine mounds. The source of the spring water is on top of the mounds. You control how hot you would like your pool to be by damming the little channels of water that run down the sides. These are the ones that I have pictures of. The Upper springs the locals have built a concrete soaking pool.


Links to other hot springs resources

This is a page lifted from an amazing source (provided by Steve Karl – from a page that is currently down). I’ve made it available to you folks…until it comes back online.

http://nsm1.fullerton.edu/~skarl/EM/Steve_Karl/Hot_Springs/HotSprings.html